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Nutrition from Cheap, Common, Local Food Ingredients


Amazed by rare, exotic, expensive food supplements from abroad or the middle of a jungle? Here's a surprise for you. There are local food ingredients which are readily available at any market near you that can also boost your energy and maintain good health. You are already using them regularly but probably do not know what they are for, aside from adding flavor to dishes..


Let's start with the common LUYA (Ginger).

Properties:

• Extracts and active constituents have shown potent antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antimutagenic, antimicrobial and possible anticancer activities.

• Considered adaptogenic, anodyne, anthelmintic, antiallergenic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, anticonvulsant, antidepressant, antifungal, antithrombotic, antitumore, antiulcer, aphrodisiac, carminative, diuretic, rubifacient, anti-platelet aggregation, hypolipidemic, thermoregulatory.

• Pungency is attributed to the pungent principle, zingerone and shogaol, while the aroma is imparted by the volatile oil.

• Considered stomachic, carminative, stimulant, diaphoretic, sialagogue, and digestive.


Many uses of ginger from various parts of the world (other than for cooking)

• In Burma, ginger and a local sweetener made from palm tree juice (htan nyat) are boiled together and taken to prevent the flu.

• In China, ginger is included in several traditional preparations. A drink made with sliced ginger cooked in water with brown sugar or a cola is used as a folk medicine for the common cold. "Ginger eggs" (scrambled eggs with finely diced ginger root) is a common home remedy for coughing. The Chinese also make a kind of dried ginger candy that is fermented in plum juice and sugared, which is also commonly consumed to suppress coughing. Ginger has also been historically used to treat inflammation, which several scientific studies support, though one arthritis trial showed ginger to be no better than a placebo or ibuprofen for treatment of osteoarthritis.

• In Congo, ginger is crushed and mixed with mango tree sap to make tangawisi juice, which is considered a panacea.

• In India, ginger is applied as a paste to the temples to relieve headache, and consumed when suffering from the common cold. Ginger with lemon and black salt is also used for nausea.

• In Indonesia, ginger (jahe in Indonesian) is used as a herbal preparation to reduce fatigue, reducing "winds" in the blood, prevent and cure rheumatism and control poor dietary habits.

• In Nepal, ginger is called aduwa, and is widely grown and used throughout the country as a spice for vegetables, used medically to treat cold and also sometimes used to flavor tea.

• In the Philippines, ginger is known as luya and is used as a throat lozenge in traditional medicine to relieve sore throat. It is also brewed into a tea known as salabat.

• In the United States, ginger is used to prevent motion and morning sickness. It is recognized as safe by the Food and Drug Administration and is sold as an unregulated dietary supplement. Ginger water was also used to avoid heat cramps in the United States.

• In Peru, ginger is sliced in hot water as an infusion for stomach aches as infusión de Kión.

• In Japan it is purported to aid blood circulation.


Here's a video on how to make Ginger Tea

Although ginger have no known side effects or drug interactions. Trust your own instinct for what is just the right amount for you or when you already have enough of anything.
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Nutrition from Cheap, Common, Local Food Ingredients Nutrition from Cheap, Common, Local Food Ingredients Reviewed by TaraLETS.com on 7:10 AM Rating: 5

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